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Irish Setters



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Irish Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Setter
Irish Setter

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The Irish Setter, Irish Red Setter, or Madra rua, is a gun dog. Madra rua means "red dog" in ancient Gaelic. Its splendid chestnut, mahogany, maroon, brick-colored, or lustrous red coat is feathery, long, and silky. A concoction of Spaniels, Setters, and Pointers were used to bring about this breed. The dog is a pointer, retriever, and natural tracker. Some Irish Setters have zero hunting talents because they were primarily bred for their beautiful cherry coats. Their temperaments are independent, and they need training from a young age. They're easily housebroken, and they get along well with other dogs and family members. They can have uptight, nervous, and high-strung constitutions that make them less than perfect house pets. However, they're always full up on energy so there's always something to do when you buy one. They have more energy than other breeds, especially similar Setters. They have a great time outdoors roaming and running free in the wide-open areas. The Irish Setters bask in the sunny environs and love free rein over lots of acreage.

The Irish Setter needs frequent brushing to maintain its gorgeous, lush coat and keep it free of mats, tangles, and knots. The undercoat gets quite dense in the winter. Irish Setter males weigh between 60 and 70 pounds. Females weigh between 50 and 65 pounds. Furthermore, the males are 23 to 26 inches at the withers, and females are 22 to 25 inches in height. They're not dubbed as the smartest dogs, but they're easy to train. They're friendly toward everyone and get happy when they're pet. Inactive city dwellers should not get Irish Setters. They're too active. They need training from an early age to temper an overactive, impulsive, high-spirited streak from overrunning the household.

The Irish Setter enjoys children, other dogs, and human companionship. They're gleeful and fun pets. Sadly, the Irish Setter suffers from some serious health problems, like all dogs. They include the following: hip dysplasia, epilepsy, entropion, thyroid problems, hyperosteodystrophy, skin allergies, eye problems, autoimmune diseases, bloat, Von Willebrand's disease, patent ductus ateriosus, and gastric pains. The best thing you can do is feed it in small increments, up to 3 times per day. Your veterinarian can advise you on how to prevent the other illnesses.

The Irish Setter lives 11 to 15 years, and it can live and hunt on all types of terrain. It's resilient and fun loving. Don't treat or train it harshly. The Irish Setter has been exhibited in many dog shows and contests over the ages, and its colors have varied slightly. Patches of white and blotches of red often intermingled. Irish Setters are happy-go-lucky, good-natured, friendly dogs; fortunately for their owners, Irish Setters are said to be the most attractive of all breeds, bar none.

Also called Red Setter.


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